Know Your Contractor Before You Hire

By Clark, Campbell, Lancaster & Munson, P.A. 

Q: I was thinking about hiring a contractor to do some work on my house, but I’ve heard horror stories about unlicensed contractors doing shoddy work and running off before the work is finished. What can I do to protect myself?

A: A “contractor” is any person who constructs, repairs, alters, remodels, adds to, demolishes, subtracts from, or improves any building or structure for compensation, including related improvements to real estate. For example, you’ll need a licensed contractor if your remodel entails the alteration or replacement of a load-bearing wall for compensation, but a person doesn’t need to be licensed to paint or install cabinets, wood/tile flooring, or insulation regardless of compensation.

If the work being done to your home requires a licensed contractor, your first step should be to verify your contractor is licensed to do the particular work. All licensed contractors are regulated by the Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation (DBPR). You should verify your contractor’s license by going to www.myfloridalicense.com/dbpr and clicking on the Verify a License tab. You may search using the contractor’s name or license number, or you may search by license type or do a general city or county search. You may also call the DBPR Customer Contact Center at (850) 487-1395 to verify your contractor’s license is active. Ask your contractor for references to verify and check your contractor’s previous work.

There’s a difference between whether a contractor is “certified” or “registered.” A “certified” contractor is licensed by the State of Florida and may operate in any city or county in Florida. A “registered” contractor is licensed by a particular city or county after taking and passing a local competency examination and may operate only in the city or county of registration and any other neighboring locales which accept the contractor’s registration.

The Construction Industry Licensing Board licenses individuals for construction work, and the Electrical Contractors’ Licensing Board licenses individuals for electrical work. If you discover your contractor isn’t licensed, you can report the unlicensed activity by calling the Unlicensed Activity (ULA) Hotline at (866) 532-1440 or emailing ULA@myfloridalicense.com.

Licensed contractors are authorized to perform work only within the scope of their license. Some of the different license categories include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Air conditioning
  • Building
  • General
  • Mechanical
  • Plumbing
  • Pool/spa
  • Roofing
  • Solar.

You should also make sure your contractor carries all required insurance. In order to receive a general contractor’s license in the State of Florida, a general contractor must carry minimum general liability insurance of $300,000 for bodily injury and $50,000 for property damage. All other categories must maintain a minimum of $100,000 liability and $25,000 for property damage, or in amounts as defined by the Board. Ask your contractor for a copy of their Certificate of Insurance showing at least these minimum insurance coverages as well as workers’ compensation insurance before your contractor commences any work on your property.

Be aware that commercial general liability insurance policies do not insure the contractor against defective workmanship or work incorporating defective products or materials. Also, most homeowners’ insurance policies won’t provide coverage for damage to your home caused by defective workmanship.

There are many different forms of contracts used by contractors, and they’re typically written from a contractor’s perspective instead of a homeowner’ s perspective. Therefore, you should have an attorney review your construction contract before you sign to ensure you’re protected.

CCLM Law

CCLM Law

Originally founded by Ron Clark in 1988, Clark, Campbell, Lancaster & Munson, P.A. has grown steadily as a result of our commitment to recruiting and retaining talented, hard-working, and caring attorneys and staff, to being dedicated to giving back to our community, to providing our clients with professional, timely, and quality legal services, and, generally, to provide excellent, responsive, and result-oriented services to our clients. We strive to keep our clients informed and involved and are proud to have developed long-term relationships with our clients.
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