Real Estate

Defect Disclosure Requirements for a Residential Sale

Historically, when real property was being bought and sold the doctrine of caveat emptor or “let the buyer beware” controlled. Under this doctrine, it was the buyer’s sole responsibility to determine if any defects were affecting the property and the seller had no obligation to bring such defects to the buyer’s attention.

Many jurisdictions, including Florida, have abandoned the doctrine of caveat emptor to an extent and have created a duty for sellers to disclose certain defects. In a Florida residential sale, where the seller of a home knows of facts materially affecting the value of the property which are not readily observable and are not known to the buyer, the seller is under a duty to disclose them to the buyer. If the seller fails to disclose latent defects, then the buyer can bring a lawsuit against the seller for damages relating to any such defect.

Importantly, selling a house “as-is,” or including an “as is” clause in a residential sales contract does not excuse the seller’s duty to disclose latent defects. An “as-is” sale is a sale in which the seller has no obligations to make repairs to the property but the seller still must disclose any known latent defects.

When selling your home, it is important to make any disclosures regarding potential latent defects in writing. If you make disclosures regarding latent defects orally you may have difficulty proving at a later date that you made the disclosures. If a buyer then brings a lawsuit against you for failing to disclose a latent defect, you might not be in as strong a position as if you had made the disclosure in writing at the outset. As a best practice, when disclosing latent defects, do so in writing.

A seller is only responsible for disclosing latent defects which the seller has actual knowledge. A seller’s obligation to disclose latent defects does not turn the seller into a guarantor as to every condition of the house being defect-free. If a buyer purchases a home and discovers a latent defect, he or she will not be able to hold the seller liable unless the seller knew of the defect and the defect materially affects the value of the property. This protects sellers from being in the almost impossible position of being responsible for any latent defect in a home that becomes known to a buyer after the sale.

The Florida statutes make certain exceptions regarding disclosure of some latent defects which certain buyers may consider to be material. For example, a seller has no obligation to disclose that an occupant of the property is infected with HIV or AIDS; or that the property was the site of a homicide, suicide, or death.

If you have purchased a home and discovered a latent defect for which you believe the seller had actual knowledge and failed to disclose, you should promptly consult with an attorney to explore any legal options you might have. Similarly, if you are a seller who

has been contacted regarding a claimed latent defect in a house you sold, you should promptly contact an attorney to discuss your legal options.

Matt Kelly is an attorney with the law firm Clark, Campbell, Lancaster & Munson, P.A. in Lakeland. Questions can be submitted to thelaw@cclmlaw.com.

CCLM Law

Originally founded by Ron Clark in 1988, Clark, Campbell, Lancaster & Munson, P.A. has grown steadily as a result of our commitment to recruiting and retaining talented, hard-working, and caring attorneys and staff, to being dedicated to giving back to our community, to providing our clients with professional, timely, and quality legal services, and, generally, to provide excellent, responsive, and result-oriented services to our clients. We strive to keep our clients informed and involved and are proud to have developed long-term relationships with our clients.
CCLM Law