By Kevin R. Albaum, Esq.
A transition from a senior’s home to an assisted living facility or nursing home is never easy for a family. What makes matters even more difficult is for the senior’s spouse or children to have to bear this new large monthly expense for an unknown amount of time. My best advice is to explore your options to help pay for care immediately before continuing to cut check after check to pay for the senior’s care. Alternative options to pay for care are as follows: Long Term Care Insurance, Medicare, Medicaid, and Veteran’s benefits.

Long Term Care Insurance: Ask the Senior if they have long-term care insurance. If they say no, then ask about life insurance (as sometimes life insurance policies have a rider added to them which can cover long-term care needs). Be sure to review all such policies in depth to see if benefits are available and if so, what the triggering event is for the insurance company to begin paying out the benefits. Long Term Care benefits usually do not begin to pay out until a person can prove with medical records that they are in need of assistance with activities of daily living (“ADLs”). ADLs are used to gauge a person’s level of functioning and generally include the following: bathing, getting dressed, transferring, eating, continence and toileting. If assistance is needed with enough ADLs, an insurance company will then begin paying out benefits in accordance with the insurance policy guidelines. The benefits can often be used to pay for home care, assisted living care, or nursing home care.

Medicare: Medicare does not generally pay for assisted living care. However, if a person requires skilled nursing care, Medicare part A generally covers up to 100 days of skilled nursing care for any new benefit period (A person gets a new benefit period if at least 60 days has passed since the person last received care in hospital or skilled nursing facility). For a person to receive the full 100 days of Medicare coverage, they also must be able and willing to participate in the prescribed therapies and must be progressing in treatment. The first 20 days (of the 100 total days) are paid by Medicare in full. Days 21-100 will require a co-pay around $165 daily and Medicare will pay the rest (the co-pay amount varies if a person has a Medicare Advantage plan or supplemental plan). After day 100, Medicare skilled nursing care benefits end and the senior (or their family) will have to pay the entire cost of skilled nursing care with no further help from Medicare. Therefore, Medicare is not a long term solution to paying for long term care.

Medicaid: Medicaid benefits can help to pay for home care, assisted living, and nursing home benefits in Florida. An applicant must be assessed and determined to be disabled and in need for the benefits they are requesting. To become financially eligible for benefits, generally, a person must have countable assets under $2,000 and a monthly income under $2,250. Some assets are non-countable for Medicaid purposes such as the applicant’s home, one (1) car, and prepaid burial arrangements. There are restrictions on the applicant’s spouse’s assets as well. If a person has questions regarding their eligibility or how to apply for the different Medicaid programs, an elder law attorney should be consulted.

There is usually a waiting list before a person can apply for home care and assisted living benefits in Florida, however, there is no wait if a person needs to apply for nursing home benefits.

Medicaid benefits are only retroactive for up to a maximum of three (3) months before application date, so it is important to move quickly to apply for benefits if a person expects to reside in assisted living or nursing home indefinitely. All nursing homes take Medicaid nursing home benefits, however, only about fifty percent (50%) of home care companies and assisted living facilities in Polk County, take Medicaid benefits. Applying for and being granted benefits for either Medicaid program often leads to substantial monthly saving for the senior.

Veterans Benefits: A Veteran, their spouse, or surviving spouse may be eligible to receive Aid & Attendance through the Department of Veterans Affairs (“VA”). To be eligible for this pension program, a person must have limited assets and income, and be permanently or completely disabled according to the VA’s disability requirements. To be eligible for this pension, the veteran must also have been discharged under a condition that was non-dishonorable and served ninety (90) days of service with at least one (1) day in one of the following wars: WWI, WWII, Korean War, Vietnam War, or Persian Gulf War.

The pension comes in the form of additional income each month to the senior and is direct deposited into the recipient’s bank account and can be used to pay a caregiver in the home, assisted living facility, or for skilled nursing care. There are also State Veterans Home that provide nursing home and other services to Veterans. It is important to contact the VA to determine eligibility and availability for such programs.

If you or a family member wants to further explore options to pay for long-term care, it is recommended to discuss your options with an elder law attorney who can help identify possible housing options and benefit programs that may be available in your specific situation.

Kevin Albaum is an attorney in the Elder Law Practice at Clark, Campbell, Lancaster & Munson, P.A. Questions can be submitted online to

What happens when nobody wants to serve on an association’s board of directors?

By. Dan Rich

Serving on a homeowner association, or HOA, board of directors is a thankless job that often fails to receive the recognition it rightfully deserves. Sadly, communities sometimes experience a dilemma where the old board members have served to their term limit and no other volunteers are interested in stepping up to the plate to volunteer their time and effort as a replacement board member. This creates two legal issues, the first is whether the old “termed out” board members can stay on the board as well as what happens if nobody is willing to serve on the HOA board moving forward.

Under Florida law, HOA directors are entitled to serve for their term and until their successor is duly elected (Emphasis added). Essentially, what this means is that if no new directors are willing to volunteer Florida law permits those people who are already on the board to continue to serve until a replacement steps forward to take their position. With that being said, you may be asking yourself whether that means that an existing board member is ever able to resign or step down from their position as a board member? The answer is yes, any board member at any time can express their intent to resign as a director and/or an officer but said resignation may not be without consequences because a HOA board needs officers and a quorum to conduct day-to-day business.

The definition of a “quorum” will change depending on the language of your governing documents, but the most common quorum definition is generally fifty-one percent (51%) director participation. For example, if an association is made up of a five-member board, a quorum would only be established after three of the board members decided to act. Failure to have enough directors to meet the definition of a quorum under your governing documents will prevent the HOA from being able to hold meetings and conduct meaningful business; however, resignations can also have a grave impact if the person stepping down is not only a director, but also an officer.

Officers of the board include the President, Secretary, Treasurer and sometimes Vice-President. The roles and duties of those offices are generally outlined in your association’s governing documents and provide each officer with certain abilities and powers. If a director, who is also an officer, decides to resign from the board not only will said resignation impact the ability to establish a quorum, but the vacancy may also impact the association’s ability to sign checks to pay third parties, access the HOA’s bank account or to enter into contracts with vendors and other providers.

Up to this point all scenarios have assumed that at least one director is willing to serve on the board, but what happens when all directors have resigned and nobody is willing to replace them? Section 720.3053, Florida Statutes, provides that “if an association fails to fill vacancies on the board of directors sufficient to constitute a quorum in accordance with the bylaws, any member may give notice of the member’s intent to apply to the circuit court within whose jurisdiction the association lies for the appointment of a receiver to manage the affairs of the association.”

There is a particular form for the notice, which is provided in Section 720.3053, that states that the petition to the court will not be filed if the necessary vacancies to establish a quorum are filled with thirty (30) days after the notice is posted or transmitted to all owners. The Florida legislature added this provision in hopes that the notice will conjure up enough volunteers willing to serve on the board to prevent the appointment of a receiver. If the 30 day window expires and nobody steps forward, the member who transmitted the notice can then petition the court for a receiver to run the association.

Unlike customary directors who take the position without compensation, Section 720.3053, provides that the receiver is entitled to receive a salary and reimbursement of all costs and attorneys’ fees payable from association funds. It also goes on to say that the “association shall be responsible for the salary of the receiver, court costs and attorneys’ fees.”

The difference between “free” volunteer directors and paid receivers with their accompanying fees can be a large number that has a drastic impact on the reserves of an HOA. Monies reserved for common area maintenance, repairs and just general upkeep could be directed to pay the receiver’s salary to run your community. Using association funds to pay a receiver is never a good idea as funds being diverted away from general upkeep and repairs will inevitably take a visible toll on your community. To prevent receivership from happening, I would encourage everyone who lives in a HOA and is even slightly pondering volunteering as a director to strongly consider stepping up and serving as a director the next time your community has an election. Your participation may have a greater impact than you ever realized before!

Dan Rich is an attorney with the law firm Clark, Campbell, Lancaster & Munson, P.A. in Lakeland. Questions can be submitted to

Harassment in the Workplace

Title VII is a federal law which seeks to address discrimination and harassment in workplaces. Title VII regulates employers with 15 or more employees. Title VII prohibits harassment of individuals based on the following protected characteristics: race, color, national origin, sex, religion, and some other factors.

What constitutes harassment?

For an employee to bring a harassment claim under Title VII, the employee must possess a protected characteristic as identified above, be subject to harassment, the harassment must be related to a protected characteristic as identified above, and the harassment must be severe enough that it resulted in a change in the terms or conditions of the employee’s employment or created a “hostile” work environment. Finally, there must be a basis for holding the employer liable.

A “hostile” work environment exists where harassment unreasonably interferes with the employee’s performance or creates an intimidating, hostile, or offensive environment for the employee. The conduct of the harasser must be severe and pervasive in order for an employee to establish a hostile work environment. The factors that courts analyze to determine if conduct amounts to a hostile work environment are the frequency of the conduct, the severity of the conduct, whether the conduct was physically threatening or humiliating, and whether the conduct unreasonably interfered with the employee’s job performance. The factors are analyzed through a mixed objective and subjective approach. The conduct must be subjectively perceived by the employee and the conduct must be judged objectively under a reasonable person standard.

It is important to note that employees are not protected by Title VII against general rudeness, horseplay, or even workplace flirtation. Title VII is not a general civility code and is meant to protect employees against conduct that involves patterns or allegations of extensive, long lasting, unaddressed, and uninhibited threats or conduct.


How should employers handle harassment?

 To limit liability for harassment claims, employers should take reasonable care to prevent harassment through training and written policies, diligently investigate any claims of harassment, and correct any reported harassment or harassment about which the employer becomes aware. An employer can minimize liability for harassment committed by a supervisor if it implements and takes the above steps in a reasonable manner. It is also important to have written policies in place and to have the policies reviewed periodically by an attorney ensure that the policies comply with current law. If you are an employer that has a written policy it is recommended to have an employee sign and acknowledge receipt of the policy.

Employers become liable for non-supervisor harassment if they knew or should have known of the harassing conduct, but failed to take prompt remedial action.

Both instances of harassment, whether supervisory or non-supervisory, require that the employer quickly and reasonably respond to any allegations of harassment. Employers can limit their liability by taking corrective action that is immediate, appropriate, and reasonably likely to stop the harassment. Examples of actions to limit liability include, confronting and counseling the alleged harasser in a prompt manner, disciplining the alleged harasser if warranted, adjusting schedules or transferring the alleged harasser to end the alleged harassment, and by being committed to training and policies which prevent harassment.

If an allegation of harassment has been brought against you as an employer, contact an attorney immediately to protect your rights.

Is Your Minor Child Protected if Something Happens to You?

By Kevin R. Albaum

My wife and I had our first child in November of last year (Nina). Our first order of business, like many others, was to purchase more life insurance coverage. We thought that by purchasing more life insurance, Nina would be provided for financially and thus protected if we were to unexpectedly die. However, in order to adequately provide for and protect a minor child in the event of both parents dying, purchasing life insurance should be just the first piece of a puzzle.

Who Gets Custody of the Minor Child?
If both parents are incapacitated and/or deceased, under Florida law, any family member or other person interested in the welfare of the minor child can petition the local probate court to become the guardian of the person and guardian of the property for the minor child. This often leads to legal fights (with a minor child caught in the middle) between aunts, uncles, godparents, and grandparents regarding who the court will choose to raise the child and manage their inheritance until the minor child turns eighteen (18).
If avoiding that potential family feud is desired, parents can proactively name a preneed guardian for their minor child in either their last will and testament or in a declaration of preneed guardian document that is filed with the local clerk of court during the parent’s lifetime. Not only can parents name the preneed guardian but they can also expressly bar someone from ever becoming the guardian of the minor child. By naming a preneed guardian, if a guardianship case is ever initiated, a rebuttable presumption arises that the person nominated by the parents as the preneed guardian is entitled to serve as the guardian for the minor child.

Don’t Accidentally Give The Minor Their Inheritance at Eighteen 
Under Florida law, a minor child cannot have more than $15,000 (in most situations) unless those funds are held in a guardianship of the property. When a guardianship of the property is in existence, there are legal expenses, court oversight of the spending, and the funds are often required to be held in restricted depositories. Additionally, a guardianship of the property terminates when a minor child turns eighteen (18). This means the minor child receives their entire inheritance on her 18th birthday.

Many parents plan to avoid the expense of a guardianship of the property and/or want to protect their children from accessing large amounts of money at age eighteen (18). This can be accomplished by crafting a last will or revocable trust to have an additional testamentary trust built into it that would hold the minor child’s funds in trust for a longer period of time. The parents also name a trustee (individual, professional, trust company) to manage the funds and make distributions to the minor child. If assets are structured to enter a trust for a minor child, they will not be subject to guardianship. The trust can be set up to hold the funds well beyond the time the minor child reaches the age of majority and the trustee will not have to distribute the funds to the minor child until the age the parents desire. I often draft testamentary trusts that terminate at age 25, 30, or 35 to avoid an 18-year-old receiving their entire inheritance too young.

If you desire to name a preneed guardian or set up your estate plan to protect your minor child, it is recommended to discuss your options with an estate planning attorney to determine the best way to structure the estate plan to meet your specific goals.

Adverse Possession & Squatter’s Rights

By: Clark, Campbell, Lancaster & Munson, P.A.

 Q: A few years ago my neighbor put up a fence, and I think it encroaches onto my property by a few inches.  Does my neighbor have a claim for adverse possession for part of my land?

 A:  There is an old saying that possession is 9/10ths of the law, but oh what a difference 1/10th can make.  Before proceeding you should obtain an updated survey of your property by a licensed surveyor to confirm your neighbor’s fence is indeed encroaching onto your property.

In order for your neighbor to claim adverse possession of part of your land, certain requirements must be satisfied.  Adverse possession may be claimed with color of title, such as pursuant to a defective deed, or without color of title, such as with a substantial enclosure like a fence.  Moreover, the person claiming adverse possession bears the burden of proof, and adverse possession must be proven by clear and convincing evidence.

For your neighbor to claim adverse possession, your neighbor’s possession of your property must be open, notorious, exclusive, and continuous.  What constitutes open and notorious is fact intensive.  The use must be with the owner’s knowledge or so open, notorious, and visible that knowledge of the use by the neighbor is imputed to the owner.  For example, your neighbor put up a fence, started using part of your land for a garden, and tends to that garden every day.

To have a claim for adverse possession, the possession must be exclusive such that your neighbor cannot possess the property with you or the public.  However, two or more people may claim title by adverse possession of another’s property and, if successful, would take title as tenants in common.

Your neighbor would also have to show that your neighbor’s possession has been continuous, consecutive, and unbroken for a period of 7 years.  Any break in the 7-year period is fatal to the adverse possession claim.  However, in Florida, under the doctrine of tacking, an adverse possessor may add his or her period of possession to that of a prior adverse possessor to establish continuous possession for the 7-year period.   Therefore, if you had a previous neighbor who initiated the adverse possession, your current neighbor may benefit from the earlier period of adverse possession as long as the periods are consecutive, continuous, and unbroken.

However, even if your neighbor satisfies the requirements above, an adverse possessor must also pay all outstanding taxes on the portion of the property being adversely possessed for 7 years and notify the property appraiser of the adverse possession pursuant to statute, and this is usually that 1/10th difference where an adverse possession claim fails.  Once the property appraiser receives notice of adverse possession, the property appraiser is then required by law to notify the property owner of record that the property is subject to an adverse possession claim.

Therefore, if you’re concerned your neighbor might have a claim for adverse possession, you may want to be a good neighbor and kindly ask your neighbor to move his fence if your survey indicates it encroaches onto your property.  If your neighbor still refuses to move his fence, then you should consider contacting an attorney and taking legal action if you suspect your neighbor may have a claim for adverse possession.

What If A Deceased Person Owes You Money?

By Kevin R. Albaum, Esq.
Clark, Campbell, Lancaster & Munson, P.A.

When a person owes you money and dies, all is not necessary lost and the funds can still be recovered at times from the deceased person’s probate estate if proper procedure is timely followed by you as the creditor.  If a person dies and has assets that are subject to probate administration, any creditor of the deceased person may prepare a written “Statement of Claim” in an attempt to recover from the deceased person’s estate.  The Statement of Claim is then filed in the probate case of the deceased person. The Statement of Claim should include the following information: the basis of the claim; the name and address of the Claimant (and their attorney, if any); the amount of the claim; when the amount is due or will become due; if the debt is contingent or unliquidated; and if the debt is/is not secured.

When a Statement of Claim is timely filed in a probate case, the person administering the probate case (or their attorney) will have to resolve the claim by either: paying the claim, objecting to the claim, paying a portion of the claim, or not paying any of the claim if the estate has insufficient assets to pay the claim. If a Statement of Claim is not timely filed, the claim will be forever barred. Therefore, it is very important to understand the legal deadlines of when creditor claims are time barred and to act fast to file a Statement of Claim when a person who owes you money dies.

What If There Is No Probate, Can I Still File A Statement of Claim?

If no one comes forward to start a probate case, a Statement of Claim cannot be filed as there is no one in place to resolve the deceased person’s debts.  However, a document known as a “Caveat” can be filed with the probate court in the county where the deceased person resided at the time of their death.  The Caveat is a written notice to the court that acts as a bookmark so that the person who filed the Caveat, known as the “Caveator”, is notified if any probate case is filed in the deceased person’s name. When a creditor files a Caveat, the Clerk of Court is required to notify the creditor if a probate case is initiated and to provide the creditor with contact information for the person who initiated the probate proceedings.  Generally, after a creditor is notified of a probate case being opened, at that time, the Statement of Claim would then be prepared and filed in the probate case by the Caveator.

A Caveat is not just for creditors but also can be used by any interested person who is apprehensive that a probate case will be administered without their knowledge or any family member of the deceased person who is concerned they will not be notified by the rest of the family when a probate proceeding occurs.

If a deceased person owes you money, it is recommended to discuss your options with a probate attorney to determine whether it makes sense to file a Statement of Claim or Caveat and whether it is likely you would be able to recover from the deceased person’s estate.

Kevin Albaum is an attorney in the Elder Law Practice at Clark, Campbell, Lancaster & Munson, P.A. Questions can be submitted online to

When does a gathering of directors result in a homeowner’s association Board meeting?

By: Dan Rich, Esq.
Clark, Campbell, Lancaster & Munson, P.A.

Some of the most frequent questions I face in my representation of homeowner’s associations, or “HOA’s”, relate to whether a gathering of directors is considered a “Board meeting” that must comply with the formalities outlined in Chapter 720, Florida Statutes. These questions usually arise when unit owners complain that the Board is conducting business behind closed doors at meetings that were not properly noticed. In an effort to help both HOA Boards and unit owners better understand the legal definition of a “Board meeting” and its ramifications, I address some of the most common questions I receive below.

What is the legal standard for a HOA Board meeting? Section 720.303(2)(a), Florida Statutes, defines a Board meeting as any gathering for the purpose of conducting association business by the members of the Board of Directors at which a quorum is present. Typically, an HOA’s governing documents will specifically define what number of directors constitutes a “quorum”; however, the general rule of thumb is a majority of the members of the Board constitutes a quorum. Board meetings at which association business is conducted must be open to all unit owners, and proper advance notice of the meeting also must be provided to the unit owners, except in limited cases of emergency.

Can a HOA Board hold private meetings? Florida law provides two (2) limited exemptions to the above-referenced requirement to hold open Board meetings. Currently, unit owners can be restricted from attending Board meetings only when the Board is meeting with the HOA’s attorney to discuss proposed or pending litigation or the Board is meeting for the purpose of discussing personnel matters. Please note that in order to satisfy the attorney exemption, listed above, the HOA’s attorney must be present either in person or via telephone.

Can the Board restrict member participation at an “open” Board meeting? Chapter 720, Florida Statutes, expressly provides that unit owners are allowed to speak on all agenda items during a Board meeting; however, Florida law also permits HOA’s to adopt rules that regulate unit owner participation. Typical rules may restrict the amount of time that a unit owner can speak on any given agenda item (i.e., three minutes per agenda item), or provide that no unit owner may speak more than once until all other unit owners have had an opportunity to do so. Once rules are established, consistent enforcement of said rules is crucial even if it means using a watch, cell phone timer or gavel.

Can HOA directors ever get together to socialize? It is not illegal for directors constituting a quorum to socialize while limiting the conversation to the weather, the news or sharing photos of each other’s recent vacations – i.e., non-association business. However, directors must be aware that a gathering of a quorum of members of the Board – even at a purely social event– creates the risk that a disgruntled unit owner might accuse the Board members of improperly conducting a Board meeting in violation of Chapter 720.

To summarize, Chapter 720 does not prevent Board members from socializing or require that a notice must be posted every time a group of Board members might want to go out to eat or play a round of golf. Instead, the law simply provides that a gathering of a quorum of Board members whereat the Board members discuss HOA business or engage in discussions about the needs of the community must occur only in a properly-noticed Board meeting.

The above questions are only examples and are not intended to address all potential scenarios. Therefore, if you have a specific question, you should consult an attorney who has particularized knowledge regarding this aspect of HOA law.

Dan Rich is an attorney with the law firm Clark, Campbell, Lancaster & Munson, P.A. in Lakeland. Questions can be submitted to

Social Media and Your Case

By: J. Matthew Kelly, Esq.
Clark, Campbell, Lancaster & Munson, P.A.

In the United States some eighty-one percent of people have some form of a social media profile. Social media is a great way to share your life with friends but it is increasingly becoming a source of evidence in legal proceedings. It is not uncommon to see that a Facebook post was the reason for the apprehension of a criminal suspect but social media is also playing a large role in civil litigation.

Gathering the Evidence
The first mechanism an attorney or investigator may use in attempting to gather social media evidence is by simply searching the individuals name. Many people do not have their social media profiles set to private which allows for a simple search of the individuals name on the leading social media websites to lead to a wealth of personal information including information that may be damaging to your case.

However, many individuals do have some level of privacy enabled on their social media accounts. In this case profiles can still be exposed by sharing content with friends who do not have strong privacy settings or through the ordinary means of discovery in a lawsuit.

In a civil proceeding, a party may obtain discovery regarding any matter that is relevant to the lawsuit, as long as such information is not protected by some form of privilege. Florida courts have already held that pictures from Facebook and other social media postings are discoverable in lawsuits. This is even true if the individual has enacted the strictest of privacy settings. Courts in Florida have effectively acknowledged that one who creates a social media account accepts that their personal information will be shared with others regardless of the user’s privacy settings.

Authenticating the Evidence
In court proceedings, it is one thing to gather the evidence and another thing to get that evidence admitted into a proceeding to be used by the judge or jury to render a decision. While discovery allows for broad requests of information, admitting a social media post at a proceeding must meet a more exacting standard.

In order for any evidence to be admitted, including social media posts, the evidence must be authenticated. The courts want to be as certain as possible that what is being admitted is not a forgery or altered in any way. This is usually done through a series of questions to a witness which include how the post was copied or saved from the website, who made the post, and who has personal knowledge that a certain individual made the post. These questions can address any other identifying features of the proposed social media evidence. Additionally, Florida courts have begun to allow expert witnesses such as internet consultants to assist in the authentication of website evidence.

Protecting your Information
The first thing everyone should do in order to better protect social media information is to make sure you take advantage of the privacy features offered by the service itself. Just as important as your own privacy settings, it is also important to ensure that those who you share information with also have strict privacy settings activated.

However, as previously explained privacy settings will not protect your information from discovery requests. The only way to truly prevent a social media post form being used as evidence is to not make the post. If you are posting something that is related or could be related to a lawsuit ask yourself if you would want the picture or post to be seen by a judge or jury. If the answer is no, do not post it. While we all want to share our lives with our friends and family, if for example you have a pending personal injury matter, the insurance company would likely be very interested in your vacation pictures as well.

Finally, once something is posted on the internet it is never really deleted as archives of the internet are being continuously made which take snapshots of the internet at certain times. So even if your post is deleted it is likely archived and may still be discoverable.

J. Matthew Kelly is an attorney with the law firm Clark, Campbell, Lancaster & Munson, P.A. in Lakeland. Questions can be submitted to

Know Your Contractor Before You Hire

By Clark, Campbell, Lancaster & Munson, P.A. 

Q: I was thinking about hiring a contractor to do some work on my house, but I’ve heard horror stories about unlicensed contractors doing shoddy work and running off before the work is finished. What can I do to protect myself?

A: A “contractor” is any person who constructs, repairs, alters, remodels, adds to, demolishes, subtracts from, or improves any building or structure for compensation, including related improvements to real estate. For example, you’ll need a licensed contractor if your remodel entails the alteration or replacement of a load-bearing wall for compensation, but a person doesn’t need to be licensed to paint or install cabinets, wood/tile flooring, or insulation regardless of compensation.

If the work being done to your home requires a licensed contractor, your first step should be to verify your contractor is licensed to do the particular work. All licensed contractors are regulated by the Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation (DBPR). You should verify your contractor’s license by going to and clicking on the Verify a License tab. You may search using the contractor’s name or license number, or you may search by license type or do a general city or county search. You may also call the DBPR Customer Contact Center at (850) 487-1395 to verify your contractor’s license is active. Ask your contractor for references to verify and check your contractor’s previous work.

There’s a difference between whether a contractor is “certified” or “registered.” A “certified” contractor is licensed by the State of Florida and may operate in any city or county in Florida. A “registered” contractor is licensed by a particular city or county after taking and passing a local competency examination and may operate only in the city or county of registration and any other neighboring locales which accept the contractor’s registration.

The Construction Industry Licensing Board licenses individuals for construction work, and the Electrical Contractors’ Licensing Board licenses individuals for electrical work. If you discover your contractor isn’t licensed, you can report the unlicensed activity by calling the Unlicensed Activity (ULA) Hotline at (866) 532-1440 or emailing

Licensed contractors are authorized to perform work only within the scope of their license. Some of the different license categories include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Air conditioning
  • Building
  • General
  • Mechanical
  • Plumbing
  • Pool/spa
  • Roofing
  • Solar.

You should also make sure your contractor carries all required insurance. In order to receive a general contractor’s license in the State of Florida, a general contractor must carry minimum general liability insurance of $300,000 for bodily injury and $50,000 for property damage. All other categories must maintain a minimum of $100,000 liability and $25,000 for property damage, or in amounts as defined by the Board. Ask your contractor for a copy of their Certificate of Insurance showing at least these minimum insurance coverages as well as workers’ compensation insurance before your contractor commences any work on your property.

Be aware that commercial general liability insurance policies do not insure the contractor against defective workmanship or work incorporating defective products or materials. Also, most homeowners’ insurance policies won’t provide coverage for damage to your home caused by defective workmanship.

There are many different forms of contracts used by contractors, and they’re typically written from a contractor’s perspective instead of a homeowner’ s perspective. Therefore, you should have an attorney review your construction contract before you sign to ensure you’re protected.

Loved one is now deceased, what should we do?

By: Kevin R. Albaum, Esq.
Clark, Campbell, Lancaster & Munson, P.A.

As an estate planning and probate attorney, I often encounter the following question… What happens to my remains when I die? Usually, this question causes little or no concern to me as the majority of families agree on funeral, burial, and/or cremation plans for their loved one and will honor the wishes provided by the deceased person for the final resting place. However, occasionally there is a family dispute over what the deceased person intended for their final resting place or which person should get possession of the deceased person’s remains.

A person generally devises their property at death by using a Last Will and Testament or a Revocable Living Trust. Administering a probate or a trust disposes of the deceased person’s property. However, a deceased person’s bodily remains are not considered property under Florida law and bodily remains cannot be disposed by Last Will and Testament. Often times, a person will express their intent to their family and friends regarding their wishes for burial or cremation and sometimes that intent is written down or included in a Last Will and Testament. An intent shown in a Last Will and Testament (or other writing) for disposition of a person’s bodily remains generally should be honored. Any dispute over a deceased person’s bodily remains shall be resolved by a court of competent jurisdiction (often the county where the deceased person resided at time of death).

The person in charge of coordinating the funeral, burial, or cremation plans of a deceased person is the legally authorized person under Florida law. There is a priority ranking system to determine which person has the authority to plan funeral, burial, and cremation services and the order goes as follows:

1. Deceased person’s written direction
2. A person appointed in written military directive
3. The surviving spouse (except in limited circumstances such as domestic violence)
4. An adult child
5. Deceased person’s parent
6. An adult sibling
7. An adult grandchild
8. A grandparent
9. Other relative

Therefore, if a deceased person has provided written instructions regarding funeral, burial, or cremation, those wishes should be honored by the family. If no instructions were left behind, you would follow the priority rankings above to see who the legally authorized person should be to make decisions for the deceased person’s bodily remains. If the person with highest priority chooses not to help coordinate the arrangements, then the next person listed in the priority rankings will often make those decisions. The funeral establishment is required to rely upon the authorization of any one legally authorized person of that class if the person represents that she or he is not aware of any objection to the disposition of the deceased person’s bodily remains by others in the same class of the person making the representation or of any person in a higher priority class.

Additionally, the legally authorized person is not required to use their own resources to personally pay for the deceased person’s funeral, burial, or cremation and often times the deceased person will have prepaid for the arrangements during their lifetime. If there were no prepaid arrangements made by the deceased person, the family often decides to pay for the costs out of their own resources.

Kevin Albaum is an attorney in the Elder Law Practice at Clark, Campbell, Lancaster & Munson, P.A. Questions can be submitted online to