HOW TO AFFORD LONG TERM CARE

By Kevin R. Albaum, Esq.
A transition from a senior’s home to an assisted living facility or nursing home is never easy for a family. What makes matters even more difficult is for the senior’s spouse or children to have to bear this new large monthly expense for an unknown amount of time. My best advice is to explore your options to help pay for care immediately before continuing to cut check after check to pay for the senior’s care. Alternative options to pay for care are as follows: Long Term Care Insurance, Medicare, Medicaid, and Veteran’s benefits.

Long Term Care Insurance: Ask the Senior if they have long-term care insurance. If they say no, then ask about life insurance (as sometimes life insurance policies have a rider added to them which can cover long-term care needs). Be sure to review all such policies in depth to see if benefits are available and if so, what the triggering event is for the insurance company to begin paying out the benefits. Long Term Care benefits usually do not begin to pay out until a person can prove with medical records that they are in need of assistance with activities of daily living (“ADLs”). ADLs are used to gauge a person’s level of functioning and generally include the following: bathing, getting dressed, transferring, eating, continence and toileting. If assistance is needed with enough ADLs, an insurance company will then begin paying out benefits in accordance with the insurance policy guidelines. The benefits can often be used to pay for home care, assisted living care, or nursing home care.

Medicare: Medicare does not generally pay for assisted living care. However, if a person requires skilled nursing care, Medicare part A generally covers up to 100 days of skilled nursing care for any new benefit period (A person gets a new benefit period if at least 60 days has passed since the person last received care in hospital or skilled nursing facility). For a person to receive the full 100 days of Medicare coverage, they also must be able and willing to participate in the prescribed therapies and must be progressing in treatment. The first 20 days (of the 100 total days) are paid by Medicare in full. Days 21-100 will require a co-pay around $165 daily and Medicare will pay the rest (the co-pay amount varies if a person has a Medicare Advantage plan or supplemental plan). After day 100, Medicare skilled nursing care benefits end and the senior (or their family) will have to pay the entire cost of skilled nursing care with no further help from Medicare. Therefore, Medicare is not a long term solution to paying for long term care.

Medicaid: Medicaid benefits can help to pay for home care, assisted living, and nursing home benefits in Florida. An applicant must be assessed and determined to be disabled and in need for the benefits they are requesting. To become financially eligible for benefits, generally, a person must have countable assets under $2,000 and a monthly income under $2,250. Some assets are non-countable for Medicaid purposes such as the applicant’s home, one (1) car, and prepaid burial arrangements. There are restrictions on the applicant’s spouse’s assets as well. If a person has questions regarding their eligibility or how to apply for the different Medicaid programs, an elder law attorney should be consulted.

There is usually a waiting list before a person can apply for home care and assisted living benefits in Florida, however, there is no wait if a person needs to apply for nursing home benefits.

Medicaid benefits are only retroactive for up to a maximum of three (3) months before application date, so it is important to move quickly to apply for benefits if a person expects to reside in assisted living or nursing home indefinitely. All nursing homes take Medicaid nursing home benefits, however, only about fifty percent (50%) of home care companies and assisted living facilities in Polk County, take Medicaid benefits. Applying for and being granted benefits for either Medicaid program often leads to substantial monthly saving for the senior.

Veterans Benefits: A Veteran, their spouse, or surviving spouse may be eligible to receive Aid & Attendance through the Department of Veterans Affairs (“VA”). To be eligible for this pension program, a person must have limited assets and income, and be permanently or completely disabled according to the VA’s disability requirements. To be eligible for this pension, the veteran must also have been discharged under a condition that was non-dishonorable and served ninety (90) days of service with at least one (1) day in one of the following wars: WWI, WWII, Korean War, Vietnam War, or Persian Gulf War.

The pension comes in the form of additional income each month to the senior and is direct deposited into the recipient’s bank account and can be used to pay a caregiver in the home, assisted living facility, or for skilled nursing care. There are also State Veterans Home that provide nursing home and other services to Veterans. It is important to contact the VA to determine eligibility and availability for such programs.

If you or a family member wants to further explore options to pay for long-term care, it is recommended to discuss your options with an elder law attorney who can help identify possible housing options and benefit programs that may be available in your specific situation.

Kevin Albaum is an attorney in the Elder Law Practice at Clark, Campbell, Lancaster & Munson, P.A. Questions can be submitted online to thelaw@cclmlaw.com.

What happens when nobody wants to serve on an association’s board of directors?

By. Dan Rich

Serving on a homeowner association, or HOA, board of directors is a thankless job that often fails to receive the recognition it rightfully deserves. Sadly, communities sometimes experience a dilemma where the old board members have served to their term limit and no other volunteers are interested in stepping up to the plate to volunteer their time and effort as a replacement board member. This creates two legal issues, the first is whether the old “termed out” board members can stay on the board as well as what happens if nobody is willing to serve on the HOA board moving forward.

Under Florida law, HOA directors are entitled to serve for their term and until their successor is duly elected (Emphasis added). Essentially, what this means is that if no new directors are willing to volunteer Florida law permits those people who are already on the board to continue to serve until a replacement steps forward to take their position. With that being said, you may be asking yourself whether that means that an existing board member is ever able to resign or step down from their position as a board member? The answer is yes, any board member at any time can express their intent to resign as a director and/or an officer but said resignation may not be without consequences because a HOA board needs officers and a quorum to conduct day-to-day business.

The definition of a “quorum” will change depending on the language of your governing documents, but the most common quorum definition is generally fifty-one percent (51%) director participation. For example, if an association is made up of a five-member board, a quorum would only be established after three of the board members decided to act. Failure to have enough directors to meet the definition of a quorum under your governing documents will prevent the HOA from being able to hold meetings and conduct meaningful business; however, resignations can also have a grave impact if the person stepping down is not only a director, but also an officer.

Officers of the board include the President, Secretary, Treasurer and sometimes Vice-President. The roles and duties of those offices are generally outlined in your association’s governing documents and provide each officer with certain abilities and powers. If a director, who is also an officer, decides to resign from the board not only will said resignation impact the ability to establish a quorum, but the vacancy may also impact the association’s ability to sign checks to pay third parties, access the HOA’s bank account or to enter into contracts with vendors and other providers.

Up to this point all scenarios have assumed that at least one director is willing to serve on the board, but what happens when all directors have resigned and nobody is willing to replace them? Section 720.3053, Florida Statutes, provides that “if an association fails to fill vacancies on the board of directors sufficient to constitute a quorum in accordance with the bylaws, any member may give notice of the member’s intent to apply to the circuit court within whose jurisdiction the association lies for the appointment of a receiver to manage the affairs of the association.”

There is a particular form for the notice, which is provided in Section 720.3053, that states that the petition to the court will not be filed if the necessary vacancies to establish a quorum are filled with thirty (30) days after the notice is posted or transmitted to all owners. The Florida legislature added this provision in hopes that the notice will conjure up enough volunteers willing to serve on the board to prevent the appointment of a receiver. If the 30 day window expires and nobody steps forward, the member who transmitted the notice can then petition the court for a receiver to run the association.

Unlike customary directors who take the position without compensation, Section 720.3053, provides that the receiver is entitled to receive a salary and reimbursement of all costs and attorneys’ fees payable from association funds. It also goes on to say that the “association shall be responsible for the salary of the receiver, court costs and attorneys’ fees.”

The difference between “free” volunteer directors and paid receivers with their accompanying fees can be a large number that has a drastic impact on the reserves of an HOA. Monies reserved for common area maintenance, repairs and just general upkeep could be directed to pay the receiver’s salary to run your community. Using association funds to pay a receiver is never a good idea as funds being diverted away from general upkeep and repairs will inevitably take a visible toll on your community. To prevent receivership from happening, I would encourage everyone who lives in a HOA and is even slightly pondering volunteering as a director to strongly consider stepping up and serving as a director the next time your community has an election. Your participation may have a greater impact than you ever realized before!

Dan Rich is an attorney with the law firm Clark, Campbell, Lancaster & Munson, P.A. in Lakeland. Questions can be submitted to thelaw@cclmlaw.com.